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New guidelines for antibiotics use in ICUs

These guidelines have been made after witnessing the mortality rate which remains consistently high from severe sepsis, septic shock, acute bacterial meningitis, Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP), Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP), abdominal infection which includes acute pancreatitis and infected pancreatic necrosis, Skin and Soft Tissue infection, Acute Infective Diarrhoea and multi-drug resistance pathogens in ICU.

New guidelines for antibiotics use in ICUs
Doctors from AIIMS and other leading hospitals have developed the new national guidelines.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • For the first time, doctors from AIIMS and experts from other hospitals have developed national guidelines for antibiotics use in ICU
  • The guidelines will help medical institutions to set up proper structure for using antibiotics, said head of respiratory department at AIIMS
  • First doctors should understand what kind of infection it is and then analyse what kind of antibiotic will work for the patient, said a doctor

For the first time, doctors from the All India Institute of Medical Science (AIIMS) and experts from other hospitals have developed national guidelines for antibiotics use in Intensive Care Units (ICU).

These guidelines have been made after witnessing the mortality rate which remains consistently high from severe sepsis, septic shock, acute bacterial meningitis, Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP), Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP), abdominal infection which includes acute pancreatitis and infected pancreatic necrosis, Skin and Soft Tissue infection, Acute Infective Diarrhoea and multi-drug resistance pathogens in ICU. The expert panel has suggested that all patients be evaluated for the risk after multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy should be individualised to cover the commonly implicated organisms.

Dr Anant Mohan, head of respiratory department at AIIMS, said: "Antibiotic resistance is a major health challenge worldwide. The framed guidelines will help medical institutions to set up proper structure and process for using antibiotics."

Dr Chand Wattal, head of microbiology department at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, said: "We've been working on guidelines for a year. These recommendations have been made after a series of brain storming sessions. First doctors should understand what kind of infection it is and then analyse what kind of antibiotic will work for the patient."

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