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Curtiss Motorcycles Is Developing An Affordable Motorcycle

  • Confederate Motors rebranded itself as Curtiss Motorcycles back in 2017.
  • The Zeus was the company’s first all-electric offering under the new banner.
  • The more affordable offering might debut in the next 2-3 years.

Curtiss Motorcycles Is Developing An Affordable Motorcycle

It was two years ago that Confederate Motors, known for making some bonkers V-twin-powered motorcycles, decided to ditch their high-powered engines and similarly controversial name, for something greener and friendlier. 

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The result of this was the Zeus, developed under the company’s new banner ‘Curtiss Motorcycle’. And, no it wasn’t exactly a paradigm shift, some enthusiasts were worried about. Instead, the Zeus packed the same brute-like design and a jaw-dropping price tag of $75,000 (Rs 51 lakh approx) as its fossil-fuel powered ancestors.  

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Now, not everyone has $75k to spare. To combat this issue, Curtiss seems to be taking the Tesla route of focusing on more affordable offerings to fund its more ludicrous products. Or at least that’s what its recently filed sketches at the European Union Intellectual Property Office suggest. 

 

While the document contains various sketches for future models, there is one in particular which resembles something closer to production. Called the ‘Ares’, the electric motorcycle sports some interesting elements such as a carbon-fibre girder fork and alloy wheels. Considering the firm’s track record, we won’t be surprised if these components do end up in the production model.  

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The same documents suggest that we might see the Ares sometime in 2022, with a price tag of $22,000 (Rs 15 lakh approx). If it comes to fruition, Curtiss Motorcycles will have created a way different definition of electric motorcycles.

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